Korea Satellite Remote Sensing of the Arctic

Speaker: 
Hyun-Cheol Kim

Affiliation: 
Korea Polar Research Institute (KOPRI)

Seminar Date: 
28. March 2019 - 15:00 - 15:30

Dr. Hyun-Cheol Kim is the director of Unit of Arctic Sea-Ice Prediction, Korea Polar Research Institute (KOPRI).
As a remote sensing scientist, he will give us a talk regarding the research activities of KOPRI.
After the seminar, NERSC and KOPRI will sign a MoU.

The challenge of bounded, non-Gaussian, non-linear and multi-scale variables

Speaker: 
Craig Bishop

Affiliation: 
School of Earth Sciences and ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate Extremes
University of Melbourne

Seminar Date: 
8. April 2019 - 11:00 - 12:00

Current state estimation or data assimilation techniques assume Gaussian uncertainties for both forecasts and observations. However, unbiased observations of bounded variables can be shown to have highly non-Gaussian uncertainties and observation error standard deviations that depend on the value of the unknown true state. In particular, the observation error variance of such observations must tend to zero as the unknown true state tends to zero.

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Impact of sea ice sources on calibrating a wave-ice interaction model

Speaker: 
Sukun Cheng

Affiliation: 
NERSC

Seminar Date: 
22. March 2019 - 11:00 - 11:30

Because of the interaction between ocean wave and sea ice, reliable models for wave propagation in the ice-covered region is critical to sea ice morphology. We present calibration of a viscoelastic type wave-in-ice model with wave, wind, and ice data collected from the Beaufort and Chukchi seas in the autumn of 2015. The data were from multiple sources of in-situ and remote sensing measurements in the marginal ice zone during the ice advance season.

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Sea Ice Parameter Retrieval with Physical Synergy of Active and Passive Satellite Data

Speaker: 
Dr. Shiming Xu

Affiliation: 
Department of Earth System Science, Tsinghua University, China

Seminar Date: 
27. March 2019 - 13:00 - 13:45

Sea ice is a key component in the global climate system. Satellite remote sensing is the major approach to the basin-scale observation of sea ice, informing the community of key findings including accelerated shrinkage and drastic thinning of the sea ice cover. As the major method for the estimation of sea ice thickness, satellite altimetry is hindered by the snow cover over the sea ice, which introduces large uncertainty to the sea ice thickness retrieval. Meanwhile, the snow over is a direct indicator of polar hydrological cycle, and a key modulating factor of air-ice-sea interaction.

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